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Fayzullo

My one of days in pandemic

Asaka, Uzbekistan

I was born on August 5, 2001 in Andijan, Uzbekistan. I went to high school in my hometown and graduated with honors in 2017 on the basis of a red certificate and this year entered ASAKA SERVICE VOCATIONAL COLLEGE in Asaka and graduated with honors in 2020 with a red diploma this year. I was a student of the Andijan Institute of Mechanical Engineering.

Currently I am a 2nd year student of my institute, my achievements:

Group leader,

An intelligent intellectual game

In the 1st year, the champion of the faculty in the game of intelligence between the 1st year,

In the 2nd year, the captain of the PERFECT team, who is the champion of the intellectual game between the 2nd year and the faculty,

One of the young leaders of the faculty.

My hobbies are listening to music, reading books, walking in the rain and most importantly fishing.

My biggest goal is to take my parents on Hajj and study MIT for a master’s degree in the future.

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My one of days in pandemic

Apr 01, 2022 4 months ago

I begin my speech with a quote: The death of a horse, the feast of a dog. As you can see, I did not say this in vain, this phrase is directly related to COVID-19, which has not yet become an absolute thing, seeing the world in 2019, that is, from my own personality. COVID-19 has dried up so many people's pillows, forced so many states and countries to pay huge compensation. A pandemic has broken out in almost all countries and curfews have been introduced, with people spending more time at home than ever before, but the culmination is that some of the unemployed, including us, have found work. When people didn't leave their homes, my mother and I made a living by buying milk and dairy products on the streets and in the neighborhoods. may have come but we had to deal with it. Early in the morning, my mother and I milked the cows, then poured them into containers and waited for the car to arrive. A car would come and pick us up and take us to town. One by one, we would call every house through the streets where almost no human beings could be seen and ask if we needed milk or dairy products. We walked around the whole city. Sometimes our products sold out quickly, and we hurried home happy, but there were days when we went back without selling almost half of our products. The most interesting thing is that my mother and I partially realized that dairy products were sold on sunny days and on cloudy days.

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